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Comic for November 15, 2018

Dilbert - November 16, 2018 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

Google's Alphabet gives up on rescue robots

BBC Technology News - 54 min 10 sec ago
The technology giant will close its Schaft robotics division after failing to find a buyer.

Why aren’t chip credit cards stopping “card present” fraud in the US?

Ars Technica - 1 hour 23 min ago

Enlarge / Chip cards help prevent fraud but only if you use them. (credit: Patrick T. Fallon/Bloomberg via Getty Images)

A security analysis firm called Gemini Advisory recently posted a report saying that credit card fraud is actually on the rise in the US. That's surprising, because the US is three years out from a big chip-based card rollout. Chip-based cards were supposed to limit card fraud in the US, which was out of control compared to similar fraud in countries that already used EMV (the name of the chip card standard).

Chip cards work by creating a unique code for each transaction, and (ideally) require a customer to enter a PIN to verify that they want to make the purchase. This doesn't make it impossible to steal information from chip-based cards, but it does make it much harder to reuse a stolen card. By contrast, using a magnetic stripe to swipe a card simply offers all the relevant information to the merchant's card reader, which is much easier for a bad actor to steal.

Gemini Advisory now says that 60 million credit and debit card numbers were stolen in the US in the past 12 months, and most of those were chip-based cards.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Prince William criticises social media firms

BBC Technology News - 1 hour 24 min ago
Prince William and Catherine were at the BBC to discuss its work on combating cyber-bullying.

Facebook drops PR firm after revelation of anti-Soros campaign

Ars Technica - 1 hour 35 min ago

Enlarge / Facebook's Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg speaks at the conservative American Enterprise Institute in 2016. Sandberg has been the mastermind of Facebook's political strategy in recent years. (credit: Allison Shelley/Getty Images)

Facebook has cut ties with a conservative public relations group called Definers hours after a Wednesday New York Times story revealed that the group had circulated a document linking some of Facebook's left-wing critics to liberal billionaire George Soros.

According to the Times, Facebook initially hired Definers to help the tech company monitor media coverage of the company. But in October 2017, Definers started to play an active role in defending Facebook.

"A conservative website called NTK Network began publishing stories defending Facebook and criticizing Facebook rivals like Google," the Times reports. "NTK is an affiliate of Definers."

Read 5 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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