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The new Terminator board game is actually worth your time

Ars Technica - July 20, 2019 - 1:05pm

Welcome to Ars Cardboard, our weekend look at tabletop games! Check out our complete board gaming coverage at cardboard.arstechnica.com.

Even Terminator has a board game now. In the “golden age” of tabletop gaming, companies and licensing have brought us a wealth of titles, including those that no one was asking for (I’m looking at you, Ghostbusters and Wacky Races). Is Terminator Genisys: Rise of the Resistance something to get excited about?

Thankfully, yes.

Read 13 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Unlicensed “health coach” claims health advice is free speech—court disagrees

Ars Technica - July 20, 2019 - 12:31pm

Enlarge / Unlicensed "health coach" Heather Del Castillo (credit: Institute for Justice)

A federal court on Wednesday rejected claims by an unlicensed “health coach” that the unqualified health advice she provided to paying clients was protected speech under the First Amendment.

In rejecting her claim, the court affirmed that states do indeed have the right to require that anyone charging for health and medical services—in this case, dietetics and nutrition advice—be qualified and licensed. (State laws governing who can offer personalized nutrition services vary considerably, however.)

Heather Del Castillo, a “holistic health coach” based in Florida, brought the case in October of 2017 shortly after she was busted in an undercover investigation by the state health department. At the time, Del Castillo was running a health-coaching business called Constitution Nutrition, which offered a personalized, six-month health and dietary program. The program involved 13 in-home consulting sessions, 12 of which cost $95 each.

Read 9 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Do you make these mistakes with your iPhone or iPad?

ZDnet Blogs - July 20, 2019 - 12:00pm
I'm amazed how many myths and legends exist when it comes to using an iPhone or iPad. Some will slow down your device, while others are downright harmful.
Categories: Opinion

Tech Unemployment Hits 19-Year Low

Slashdot - July 20, 2019 - 1:45am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Comic for July 19, 2019

Dilbert - July 20, 2019 - 12:59am
Categories: Geek

NSO Spyware 'Targets Big Tech Cloud Services'

Slashdot - July 20, 2019 - 12:15am
Categories: Geek, Opinion

Netflix lost US subscribers in Q2 over price hikes; how can it win them back?

Ars Technica - July 19, 2019 - 11:24pm

Enlarge / Netflix CEO Reed Hastings. (credit: re:publica)

If you’ve been grumbling about the rising cost of your Netflix account, it seems you’re not alone. Netflix shared its second-quarter financial results and the company indicated that higher prices may have led to dips in the platform’s subscriber counts.

Revenue for the video streaming service totaled $4.92 billion in the second quarter, up 26% year-over-year. Net income was $271 million, with $0.60 earnings per share. Both those figures were down from Q2 in 2018 and from Q1 of 2019.

Netflix added 2.7 million paid members during the period, a big cut from the 5 million it expected to see and from the 5.5 million recorded in the year-ago quarter. “Our missed forecast was across all regions, but slightly more so in regions with price increases,” the shareholder letter read. The company insisted that competition from other platforms was not a concern, but rather that the shows it had for the second quarter weren’t enough to inspire people to subscribe.

Read 7 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Blizzard’s bad-news year continues with another co-founder’s departure

Ars Technica - July 19, 2019 - 11:02pm

Enlarge (credit: Blizzard Entertainment)

Frank Pearce, one of Blizzard Entertainment's three original founding staffers, announced his intention to leave the game-making company on Friday, effective immediately.

Pearce's announcement came via a Friday blog post at Blizzard's official site, which was appended with a note from current Blizzard president J. Allen Brack. The combined blog post indicates that last year, Pearce "stepped into an advisory role to help with the transition," which seems to indicate that his departure has been some time coming. It's unclear whether this advisory-transition period began anywhere near the time another Blizzard co-founder, Mike Morhaime, left the company in October 2018.

The departure of Pearce as chief product officer leaves only one of Blizzard Entertainment's original co-founders, Allen Adham, at the helm. Adham returned to Blizzard in 2016 after a ten-year game-development hiatus to become the company's senior vice president. Adham, Pearce, and Morhaime founded the company, which was first named Silicon & Synapse, in 1991. Their first video game under the S&S label was RPM Racing for the SNES.

Read 3 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Algae bio-curtains: Architects' radical solution to capture carbon

BBC Technology News - July 19, 2019 - 11:01pm
Scientists and architects in London have developed 'bio-curtains' to act as an alternative to urban trees.

Verizon wants you to pay $650 plus $85 a month for a 5G hotspot

Ars Technica - July 19, 2019 - 10:55pm

Enlarge / A Verizon booth at Mobile World Congress Americas in Los Angeles in September 2018. (credit: Verizon)

Verizon's 5G mobile service is available in just a handful of cities, but the carrier is charging premium prices to the few people who live in range of the network.

Verizon yesterday announced its first 5G hotspot, namely the Inseego MiFi M1000 that Verizon is selling for $650. On top of the device cost, the monthly fees for 5G service will be higher than 4G even though Verizon's 5G network barely exists.

Verizon said hotspot-only plans "start at $85 a month (plus taxes and fees)." Verizon describes the $85-per-month hotspot plan as "unlimited" when you go through the online checkout process. But the fine print states that customers get 50GB of high-speed 5G data, and 5G speeds are reduced to 3Mbps after that. The plan treats 5G and 4G data separately; it provides 15GB of high-speed 4G data and slows users down to 600kbps after that. Verizon allows 4K video streaming on 5G, while limiting video on the 4G network to 720p.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

President Trump says NASA should “listen to the other side” of exploration

Ars Technica - July 19, 2019 - 10:32pm

Enlarge / President Trump, with Apollo 11 Command Module Pilot at far left, listens to Apollo 11 Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin on Friday in the Oval Office. (credit: Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images)

On Friday, a day before the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 Moon landing, President Trump invited the crew of that mission to the Oval Office. Seated, Trump was flanked by Lunar Module Pilot Buzz Aldrin, Command Module Pilot Michael Collins, and the children of Commander Neil Armstrong.

During the 20-minute ceremony, Trump praised the efforts of the Apollo 11 crew and NASA in achieving the first Moon landing half a century ago. But pretty quickly, he pivoted to his own administration's plans for sending humans to the Moon—and eventually Mars. The administration's Artemis Program, which calls for humans to return to the Moon by 2024, has been heavily promoted by the space agency as of late.

However, Trump seems much more interested in sending humans to Mars, which he considers more inspirational than a trip back to the Moon.

Read 11 remaining paragraphs | Comments


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