Baanboard.com

Go Back   Baanboard.com > News

User login

Frontpage Sponsor

Main

Poll
As a Customer What would do to keep your ERP Implementation intact
Proactively define Business Process-- Take the Project Ownership
50%
Handover everything to System Integrator from drawing BP till implementation of ERP
0%
Hire more inhouse skilled & capable IT Resource to work directly with SI
50%
Rely on SI Architects/Consultants
0%
Total votes: 2

Baanboard at LinkedIn


Reference Content

 
RSS Newsfeeds

Motorola’s sub-$200 Moto G Fast and Moto E pack modern designs, big batteries

Ars Technica - 3 hours 10 sec ago

Motorola is releasing some cheap smartphones for 2020. You might think the company had already done this with the April release of the Moto G Stylus ($299) and the Moto G Power ($249), but today Motorola is announcing more budget devices for the US: the Moto G Fast ($199) and the 2020 version of the Moto E ($149).

Motorola's 2020 lineup of phones-at-$50-increments is getting pretty complicated, so maybe a big table would help:

Moto E (2020) MOTO G FAST MOTO G POWER MOTO G STYLUS STARTING PRICE $149.99 $199.99 $249.99 $299.99 SCREEN 6.2-inch 1520×720p LCD 6.4-inch 1560×720p LCD 6.4-inch 2300×1080 LCD 6.4-inch 2300×1080 LCD CPU Snapdragon 632
Four 1.8GHz A73 cores,
four 1.8GHz A53 cores, 14nm Snapdragon 665
Four 2GHz A73 cores, four 1.8GHz A53 cores, 11nm RAM 2GB 3GB 4GB 4GB STORAGE 32GB 32GB 64GB 128GB CAMERA 13MP Main
2MP Depth
5MP Front 16MP Main
8MP Wide Angle
2MP Macro
8MP Front 16MP Main
8MP Wide Angle
2MP Macro
16MP Front 48MP Main
16MP Wide Angle
2MP Macro
Laser autofocus
16MP Front PORTS Micro-USB, headphone jack USB-C, headphone jack BATTERY 3550mAh 4000mAh 5000mAh 4000mAh

One big oddity in Motorola's phone lineup is that none of these phones has NFC. You won't be able to use tap-and-pay with Google Pay anywhere, which is disappointing. They at least all have headphone jacks, Android 10, rear capacitive fingerprint readers, and Micro SD slots, which is nice. The Moto E is the only phone that is still using the dusty old Micro USB standard, which sadly is a normal occurrence at this price point.

Read 4 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Command & Conquer Remastered Collection review: Loving the smell of Tiberium

Ars Technica - 4 hours 33 min ago

The strategy, the explosions, the FMV sequences, the ripping guitars, and the Kane-fueled cheese—they're all back. The original 1995 game Command & Conquer: Tiberian Dawn and its 1996 prequel Red Alert have returned in today's launch of the C&C: Remastered Collection on Windows 8/10 (AmazonSteamOrigin). In good news, the package is right for the price: $20 gets you both original games, all of their expansion packs (one for C&C:TD, two for Red Alert), and each game's console-exclusive content. The complete package has been aesthetically touched up for the sake of working on modern PCs.

I've spent the past week tinkering with Command & Conquer: Remastered Collection to break down exactly what to expect and how you should temper your real-time strategy expectations. Despite a few quality-of-life tweaks, the package is otherwise faithful to the originals—almost to a fault—while its compatibility with modern PCs is mostly good enough.

From 400p to 2160p, but not without issues

The package's biggest selling point is a new coat of high-res paint. Every single asset and map element has been redrawn, and like other recent classic-game remaster projects, this one includes a handy "graphic-swap" button. By default, tap the space bar at any time during single-player modes to switch from the original 400p assets to a new, 2160p-optimized suite of units, buildings, and terrain. Here, enjoy an after-and-before gallery of both zoomed-in units and full battleground scenes.

Read 23 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Elon Musk calls for 'break up' of Amazon

BBC Technology News - 4 hours 40 min ago
The entrepreneur condemned the online retailer after it rejected a book about coronavirus.

Investors argue against excessive pay package for Activision CEO

Ars Technica - 6 hours 1 min ago

Enlarge

A major investment group with substantial holdings in Activision stock is speaking out this week against the high compensation for Activision Blizzard CEO Bobby Kotick. The move comes ahead of a shareholder vote on executive pay scheduled for June 11.

"Over the past four years, Activision Blizzard CEO Robert Kotick has received over $20 million in combined stock/option equity per year," the CtW investment group writes in a letter filed with the SEC this week. "These equity grants have consistently been larger than the total pay (the sum of base salary, annual bonus, and equity pay) of CEO peers at similar companies."

CtW—which works with union-sponsored pension funds to speak out against "irresponsible and unethical corporate behavior and excessive executive pay"—said Kotick's excessive compensation is especially concerning in light of the wave of nearly 800 layoffs the company rolled out in 2019. Those layoffs were implemented amid the announcement of "record results in 2018" for Activision and reportedly focused on "non-development teams" that were no longer needed thanks to a lighter slate of releases from the company going forward.

Read 6 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Combat drone to compete against piloted plane

BBC Technology News - 8 hours 7 min ago
The US Air Force will pit an advanced autonomous aircraft against a piloted plane in tests.

Whatever happened to the NHS contact-tracing app?

BBC Technology News - 8 hours 41 min ago
The app, first tested on the Isle of Wight, had been expected to be rolled out at the end of May.

Coronavirus: National Rail to offer 'busy station' alerts

BBC Technology News - 8 hours 59 min ago
Rail passengers will be warned if trains or stations are busy, to aid social distancing.

From Zelda to Civ to Frostpunk—can climate change be fun?

Ars Technica - 10 hours 3 min ago

For decades now, video games have concerned themselves with the end of things. From the bombed-out nuclear wasteland of Washington, DC in Fallout 3 to the flooded Hyrule of The Legend of Zelda: Wind Waker, popular games have explored the concept of the apocalypse with both goofy humor and stark seriousness, often revealing unpleasant truths in the process. So perhaps it’s no surprise that as the all-too-real climate change crisis continues to creep towards a breaking point—even as the ongoing public health disaster known as COVID-19 eclipses it in the public imagination—video game developers are taking steps to systematize the ways that rising sea levels or other ecological catastrophes might overwhelm us in the coming years.

While many of these climate changed-focused games focus on depicting the dire future that experts predict if we refuse to radically alter our behavior patterns, others are a bit more traditional in their approach. And some notable game-makers like Firaxis Games (Civilization) and 11-Bit Studios (This War of Mine) are drawing inspiration from climate-change to craft ludic dilemmas that force players to make radical decisions in the face of overwhelming odds. In other words: if these studios can't necessarily make living through the apocalypse as fun as it sounds, they can at least make it interesting.

The picturesque environments of Civ6 were about to experience some hardships.

A game that can do both

To be fair, climate scientists have understood for years now that video games have a unique ability to communicate the stakes and severity of this global crisis to a mass audience. Historically, many of these games fit well-within the strategy genre, and developers have tried different approaches to lure players in. For example, the commercial game Fate of the World often overwhelms new players with the heft of its interlocking systems: make a few bad decisions early on, and you'll quickly find yourself hurtling towards a bad ending. All you can do then is apply the lessons learned to a future playthrough. On the other hand, educational fare like the underwater exploration sim Beyond Blue lean more towards accessibility. By focusing on the specific effects of climate change—in this case, the destruction of the Earth's oceans—the game can communicate the costs of a warming climate to a wider audience.

Read 20 remaining paragraphs | Comments

Rocket Report: Falcon 9 leaps forward; a gator and a Dragon

Ars Technica - 10 hours 33 min ago

Enlarge / Falcon 9 lifts off on its most important mission to date: carrying NASA Astronauts Bob Behnken and Doug Hurley into orbit. (credit: Trevor Mahlmann)

Welcome to Edition 3.03 of the Rocket Report! We just passed a week of the highest of highs, with Saturday's Crew Dragon launch, and the lowest of lows, as this country's racial prejudice was laid bare. Jeff Manber, the CEO of Nanoracks, said it well: "The space community can, and must, do better to become part of the solution to the horrific challenges America faces today." We agree.

As always, we welcome reader submissions, and if you don't want to miss an issue, please subscribe using the box below (the form will not appear on AMP-enabled versions of the site). Each report will include information on small-, medium-, and heavy-lift rockets as well as a quick look ahead at the next three launches on the calendar.

Vega set for return-to-flight mission. After an in-flight accident in July 2019 and the COVID-19 pandemic, Arianespace has resumed preparations for the Vega rocket's return to service mission. This launch will also demonstrate the rocket's utility as a platform for rideshare missions. Launch is targeted for June 18, local time, NASASpaceflight.com reports.

Read 25 remaining paragraphs | Comments


All times are GMT +2. The time now is 23:34.


©2001-2018 - Baanboard.com - Baanforums.com