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0 - 200 GB
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Total votes: 34

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Industry & Technology

IDG Contributor Network: Why banks must have an omnichannel digital strategy

CIO.com - IT industry - June 21, 2017 - 3:39pm

It’s unquestionable that digital technology is changing the way that customers are banking globally, once it’s safe to say that every customer is irreversibly a digital customer. Digital has become more important to customers in every single aspect. Although customers have embraced digital technologies at different degrees, more and more basic transactions migrate from physical to digital channels within traditional financial institutions, which leads to a major repositioning in banks’ distribution mix, once their branch networks are being downsized. The point is that many customers have become digital-only users, preferring to prospect, purchase and interact exclusively through digital channels (internet banking, mobile banking amongst others). The market is also seeing the GAFAs (Google, Amazon®, Facebook® and Apple®) surrounding the banking industry, looking for ways to participate and create value without taking on the burden of a regulated balance sheet and providing an entirely digital journey and experience to an increasing group of customers that are quite aware of the quality, customization and availability such companies are able to provide. Therefore, what lies ahead for banks and financial institutions when it comes to better engaging with the new digital customers is, in many ways, a blank page.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: In digital, what was context now becomes core

CIO.com - IT industry - June 21, 2017 - 2:35pm

I don’t know about your company’s situation; but having looked at literally hundreds of outsourcing contracts, I see that they all have something in common. The original intent was a one-time shift to transform and improve an operational aspect. Unfortunately, IT outsourcing contracts sort of poured concrete around the outsourced processes. Thus, the quest for operational excellence through outsourcing IT has the effect of stopping companies from changing. That’s a non-starter in the digital world.

When companies begin to rotate from legacy environments into digital technologies and digital business models, it’s not long before they realize they must fundamentally rethink their assumptions around the old ways of doing things. In those old assumptions, outsourcing IT infrastructure, development and maintenance and other IT functions made sense. The assumption was those functions were not core competencies, so the company should outsource to get efficiencies of scale and price points through leveraging the outsourcer’s core expertise. That assumption was usually right; the company transformed from Point A to Point B and achieved a one-time shift in improving operations.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 3 ways big data is changing financial trading

CIO.com - IT industry - June 20, 2017 - 3:52pm

The impact big data is making in the financial world is more of a splash than a ripple. The technology is scaling at an exponential rate and the consequences are far reaching. Increasing complexity and data generation is transforming the way industries operate and the financial sector isn’t exempt.

Currently, the world is creating 2.5 quintillion bytes of data daily and this represents a unique opportunity for processing, analysing and leveraging the information in useful ways. Machine learning and algorithms are increasingly being used in financial trading to compute vast quantities of data and make predictions and decisions that humans just do not have the capacity for.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: 4 little-known factors influencing your ROI

CIO.com - IT industry - June 20, 2017 - 3:07pm

The one thing nearly every business on the face of the planet has in common, is they are all trying to bring their rate of investment (ROI) to a profitable level. While ROI applies to every aspect of business operations, the bottom line almost always comes down to the ability to convert customers.

A recent study by Econsultancy shockingly found that only about 22 percent of businesses are satisfied with their conversion rates. That doesn’t mean the rest need to radically change their ways of doing business. In many cases, solutions come from small tweaks that clear big roadblocks. Let’s talk about some factors that can significantly boost your sales and make your marketing investments work hard.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Without intellectual property licensing, where would we be?

CIO.com - IT industry - June 19, 2017 - 3:17pm

Intellectual property (IP) is a lot like taxes: you don’t care about the legal niceties until they apply to you. IP (not to be confused with the IP in TCP/IP, which stands for Internet Protocol) is the fuel that runs our information economy, the wellspring from which a thousand flowers bloom in the form of a plethora of products based on IP previously created, established, and licensed to all comers.

When an inventor creates a valuable technology and patents it, there are two ways to go:

  • exploit the technology directly and try to profit from being the sole supplier, or
  • license it to anyone on a “fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory” (FRAND) basis and nurture an entire industry.

There are plenty of examples of both.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Do you have what IT takes to be a digital leader?

CIO.com - IT industry - June 19, 2017 - 3:13pm

Disruptive digital technologies are reshaping the business landscape forcing many organizations to reinvent business models, products, and the way they engage with their customers. But not everyone is equal when it comes to digital transformation, according to just one of the key findings from this year’s Harvey Nash/KPMG Survey of nearly 4,500 technology leaders. In fact, less than one out of five (18%) are very effective at using digital technologies to advance their business strategy.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Having a go at ITIL's flow

CIO.com - IT industry - June 19, 2017 - 2:39pm

In ITIL's best practice view of the world, services are thought of in strategy, they’re designed, transitioned and put into operations in a specific lifecycle. This is how services are born and retired, or so it says. Continual service  (CSI) is done in support of all the activities, or is supposed to be done like that. We all know that ITIL is documented common sense, but we know that reality is very different.

You see in many places services, and sub-services, are there for ages. New services can be introduced, but it doesn’t happen that often. What does happen is the replacement of one technology over the other (think about upgrading from one version of Exchange to another). You can say that the service is different since it can bring new technological features, but it, at it’s core, is the same service. Technology comes and technology goes, but the fundamentals of the service should still provide value regardless of the underpinning technologies.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

6 trends shaping IT cloud strategies today

CIO.com - IT industry - June 19, 2017 - 11:00am

Cloud computing has helped many enterprises transform their IT practices over the past five years, but experts agree that the market is entering a second wave for public, private and hybrid cloud services.

According to a Forrester Research survey, 38 percent of enterprise decision-makers said they are building private clouds, with 32 percent procuring public cloud services and the remainder planning to implement some form of cloud technology this year. The hybrid cloud is also heating up, with 59 percent of respondents saying they are adopting the model. Fueling this accelerating adoption is the need for enterprises to scale their compute resources to better serve customers, Forrester Research Dave Bartoletti tells CIO.com.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

CIO Quick Takes: How CIOs assess the value of emerging technology

CIO.com - IT industry - June 16, 2017 - 5:07pm

Arthur C. Clarke, author of 2001: A Space Odyssey, wrote that “any sufficiently advanced technology is indistinguishable from magic.” A pithy maxim, to be sure, but one that deserves scrutiny.

After all, emerging technology isn’t conjured up like one of Merlin’s spells. Emerging technology represents a series of potential investments—in pure capital, time and energy—that have massive implications for the enterprise. Whether the discussion revolves around robotics or virtual reality, or what analyst firm IDC dubs "augmented humanity," CIOs have an obligation to keep their eyes to the technological horizon. They must be judicious when assessing the emerging technology landscape, advocating for the smart calls that will help secure their respective organizations’ futures.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: The privacy legacy of Edith Marcus

CIO.com - IT industry - June 16, 2017 - 3:18pm

Edith Marcus passed away recently. You may never have heard of Edith; she was a private person in the best sense of the phrase. While Edith did make use of technology, she was keenly aware of the personal information she shared, who she shared It with, and what others did with the information. For privacy professionals, that is her legacy.

Who was Edith Marcus? Bob Siegel

In full disclosure, Edith Marcus was my cousin and was 92 when she passed. She lived an amazing life from her escape from Nazi Germany as a child with her mother and grandmother to learning English by going to the movies while attending New York City schools to taking part in the birth of the state of Israel to being part of the introduction of computers to a Big 8 accounting firm.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Has outsourcing lost its strategic relevance?

CIO.com - IT industry - June 16, 2017 - 3:13pm

For more than 20 years, outsourcing and global delivery were at or near the top of the CIO to-do list. Strategically, outsourcing IT services allowed an enterprise to gain the essential capabilities it needed to endure the dramatic shifts of the last two decades – remediating billions of lines of code to support Y2K, creating first-generation websites, supporting the growth of the dotcom boom, optimizing the supply chain through massive ERP efforts and riding the giant digital transformation wave.

Somewhere along this journey, global delivery of IT services grew less important and less strategic. Cost savings became the key criteria to measure success and service providers commoditized their offerings to meet market demand. But at what cost? Industry vets would likely point to a lack of innovation, poor delivery or the recent trend to repatriate services. Indeed, the desire for continued cost cutting has made functional CIOs and global IT service providers less and less relevant.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Why AI is crucial to cyber security

CIO.com - IT industry - June 16, 2017 - 2:31pm

When you think of AI (artificial intelligence), the first thought you may have is in regards to games, recreation, and futuristic robots. After all, AI is the next big thing in virtual video games, taking "reality" to a whole new level. However, AI is so much more than that. There has been a lot of hype about AI in the last couple of years. Again, most of it in the form of promises of faster answers, better outcomes, and improved productivity. From advanced machine learning and intelligent apps to digital twins and conversational systems, AI is just breaking out of an emerging state with substantial disruptive potential across all industries, says Gartner. Please don't misunderstand, there have been many examples of advancements in various industries with AI algorithms from predictive analytics in healthcare to cognitive science.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

‘DVR for data’ gives TIAA deep insights into its digital business

CIO.com - IT industry - June 16, 2017 - 11:00am

Imagine an analytics tool that records every transaction that courses through your digital assets in real time and lets you scroll through scores of them to gain insights about your business. If such a tool -- let's call it a TiVo for your digital business -- existed it would prove incredibly valuable in helping you quantify the performance and value of technology initiatives designed to serve customers.

TIAA Chief Digital Officer Scott Blandford has created such a system for the financial services firm. The custom-built THOR (TIAA Hyperdata Online Repository) churns through data streams running through the company's websites, applications and other customer channels. The tool, which Blandford calls the "operating console for our digital business," helps TIAA glean insights about how the company can improve the software services that help consumers manage their retirement wealth and pursue financial advice.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

7 ways AI will revolutionize business travel

CIO.com - IT industry - June 14, 2017 - 8:38pm

In April, United Airlines hit a huge pocket of public relations turbulence after a passenger was forcibly removed from one of its partners’ airplanes. The incident raised questions about blindly following procedures, passenger rights, and United’s executive leadership.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

(Insider Story)

IDG Contributor Network: Telecom cost control – how to get the most savings for the least amount of effort and risk

CIO.com - IT industry - June 14, 2017 - 5:01pm

If there’s one thing telecom has taught us over the last decade, it’s that there’s nothing easy about telecom. It’s a notoriously difficult category of spend to keep in check – especially as it relates to cost and usage. Voice, data and network costs span multiple providers and geographies. Invoicing is usually decentralized, and the details are unintelligible. Carrier and provider offerings are all over the map. And, even with commoditized pricing for most services, the majority of enterprises still overspend by 30 percent or more.

Companies that set out to reduce their telecom spend are often confronted with a grim reality – it’s difficult and resource-intensive. It takes a startling amount of work to achieve savings that are meaningful to the bottom line.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How DevOps changes the delivery of IT functions

CIO.com - Infrastructure - June 13, 2017 - 4:11pm

Labor arbitrage and shared services companies have had a perfect marriage over the last 20 years. Then along came the Digital Revolution with new business models and a new construct for services. One component of the digital model construct is DevOps. It makes a significant impact on business services, but it’s important to understand how it changes the picture for labor arbitrage and shared services.

Shared service companies are structured on a functional basis. One way to think about them is they are a stack of functional expertise. In the case of IT, the stack includes such functions as infrastructure, security, application development and maintenance, and compliance. There is a multiple stack hierarchy, with each functional layer having shared service champions responsible for delivering that function cost-effectively at a high level of quality. Labor arbitrage fits perfectly into this equation in that each functional layer uses people, and the work can often be done more cost-effectively offshore than onshore.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How DevOps changes the delivery of IT functions

CIO.com - IT industry - June 13, 2017 - 4:11pm

Labor arbitrage and shared services companies have had a perfect marriage over the last 20 years. Then along came the Digital Revolution with new business models and a new construct for services. One component of the digital model construct is DevOps. It makes a significant impact on business services, but it’s important to understand how it changes the picture for labor arbitrage and shared services.

Shared service companies are structured on a functional basis. One way to think about them is they are a stack of functional expertise. In the case of IT, the stack includes such functions as infrastructure, security, application development and maintenance, and compliance. There is a multiple stack hierarchy, with each functional layer having shared service champions responsible for delivering that function cost-effectively at a high level of quality. Labor arbitrage fits perfectly into this equation in that each functional layer uses people, and the work can often be done more cost-effectively offshore than onshore.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: How DevOps changes the delivery of IT functions

CIO.com - Infrastructure - June 13, 2017 - 4:11pm

Labor arbitrage and shared services companies have had a perfect marriage over the last 20 years. Then along came the Digital Revolution with new business models and a new construct for services. One component of the digital model construct is DevOps. It makes a significant impact on business services, but it’s important to understand how it changes the picture for labor arbitrage and shared services.

Shared service companies are structured on a functional basis. One way to think about them is they are a stack of functional expertise. In the case of IT, the stack includes such functions as infrastructure, security, application development and maintenance, and compliance. There is a multiple stack hierarchy, with each functional layer having shared service champions responsible for delivering that function cost-effectively at a high level of quality. Labor arbitrage fits perfectly into this equation in that each functional layer uses people, and the work can often be done more cost-effectively offshore than onshore.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

Inside Symantec’s bid to build the Amazon of cybersecurity tools

CIO.com - IT industry - June 13, 2017 - 11:05am

If Sheila Jordan and the rest of Symantec's senior leadership team complete their vision they will transform the company into the Amazon.com of cybersecurity, essentially a one-stop shop where CIOs and consumers alike can buy digital tools to protect their data assets. The Symantec CIO is deploying her IT department's resources to help build out a software subscription platform for SaaS applications, part of a broader strategy to deliver solutions that are more in line with the evolving purchasing preferences of CIOs and CISOs.

"We want it to be like an Amazon experience where with a handful of clicks you can book your cloud security subscription," Jordan tells CIO.com.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here

IDG Contributor Network: Two ITIL processes that will protect your existence

CIO.com - Infrastructure - June 9, 2017 - 5:30pm

In my recent blog entry, I talked about the future of the traditional IT organization and the need for sound governance and processes in the implementation of IT solutions, especially if they are leveraged through cloud and outsourced solution suppliers.

IT service management (ITSM) and IT infrastructure library (ITIL) have become the dominant approach and best practices for operational excellence in most IT organizations. Yet, I question why so many have implemented only four or five of the 26 defined ITIL 2011 processes given the strength and magnitude of guidance that the ITIL IT service lifecycle provides.

To read this article in full or to leave a comment, please click here


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